Trilobite Multiples

The first law of ecology is that everything is related to everything else. –Barry Commoner

Ampyxina bellatula, Marquoketa Formation, Ordovician Period, Missouri
Ampyxina bellatula molts, Maquoketa Formation, Ordovician Period, Missouri. These trilobites lack free cheeks (note absence of long genal spines) and are therefore molts. Did these animals gather to molt communally? Largest molt is 1.0 cm long.

Associations of large numbers of monospecific trilobite molts on a single bedding surface occur worldwide throughout marine rocks of Paleozoic age. Often, it looks as though trilobites gathered to molt at a specific place and time. Sometimes it’s not easy to tell if the assemblage reflects paleobiology and not simply a hydraulic accumulation of molted exoskeletal sclerites, though.

Elrathia kingii, Wheeler Shale Formation, Cambrian Period, Utah
Elrathia kingii (multiple), Wheeler Shale Formation, Cambrian Period, Utah. Most of these trilobites have free cheeks and are probably not molts. These animals likely died at the same time, in the same place. Largest trilobite is 3.2 cm long.

Sometimes a single bedding surface may contain a monospecific (or nearly) assemblage of complete trilobite specimens. More rarely, one finds several species of complete specimens on the same bedding surface (as below).

Raymondites plate, Ordovician Period
Ceraurus globulobatus (multiple), Raymondites spiniger (center right), and Bumastoides milleri (upper left), Bobcaygeon Formation, Ordovician Period, near Brechin, Ontario. This slab contains three species of trilobites, one of which (Ceraurus) is in a variety of preservational states ranging from complete, outstretched and articulated to scattered and disarticulated. Largest Ceraurus is 3.4 cm long.

Although a complete understanding of these associations will likely forever elude us, these multi-species plates are of great interest to the collector. This is especially true if it is certain that the slab reflects a completely natural assemblage of rare or unusual species.

Raymondites plate detail, Ordovician Period
Raymondites (upper right) plate detail, Ordovician Period.

Many multiple commercial specimens from Russia and Morocco, on the other hand, are likely the product of manipulation. Large slabs may have had a pit or pits excavated into it, and trilobites or other fossils added and epoxied into place. A texture added to the surface can conceal the additions. This being the case, a collector should pay no more than he/she would for the specimens in isolation, the association being neither paleoecological nor sedimentological (i.e., scientifically meaningless).

Russian double, Ordovician Period
Asaphus cornutus (left) and Pseudoasaphus globifrons (right), Ordovician Period, St. Petersburg region, Russia. Real trilo-buddies or a composite? Most likely the latter. Larger trilobite is 8.1 cm long.

©2017 Christopher R. Cunningham. All rights reserved. No text or images may be duplicated or distributed without permission.

 

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